PC Games 2015

2014 is dead—nyoooo! It was pretty good, but it could do nothing to halt the unstoppable wave of new games 2015 will bring. There are talky games, shooty games, driving games, games that let you bake bread and games that let you become bread. There are new monsters to kill, new plot twists to uncover and new armies to command; it’s going to be awesome.

Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". These publications provided game code that could be typed into a computer and played, encouraging readers to submit their own software to competitions.[5] Microchess was one of the first games for microcomputers which was sold to the public. First sold in 1977, Microchess eventually sold over 50,000 copies on cassette tape. Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". By 1988, the enormous popularity of the Nintendo Entertainment System had greatly affected the computer-game industry. The 1993 release of Doom on the PC was a breakthrough in 3D graphics, and was soon ported to various game consoles in a general shift toward greater realism.

(The game Les Manley 2 satirized this by depicting two beautiful women exhaust the hero in bed, by requesting that he again explain the difference between extended and expanded memory.) Computer Gaming World provided technical assistance to its writers to help install games for review.[32] By 1996, the growing popularity of Microsoft Windows simplified device driver and memory management. Tomb Raider in 1996 was one of the first 3D third-person shooter games and was praised for its revolutionary graphics. Although personal computers only became popular with the development of the microprocessor and microcomputer, computer gaming on mainframes and minicomputers had previously already existed. By the end of 1989, however, most publishers moved to at supporting at least 320x200 MCGA, a subset of VGA.[21] VGA gave the PC graphics that outmatched the Commodore Amiga. Although personal computers only became popular with the development of the microprocessor and microcomputer, computer gaming on mainframes and minicomputers had previously already existed. These publications provided game code that could be typed into a computer and played, encouraging readers to submit their own software to competitions.[5] Microchess was one of the first games for microcomputers which was sold to the public.